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Short-Term & Long-Term Disability

Short-Term & Long-Term Disability

If you’re injured, a short-term disability insurance policy can help replace some of your lost income during the initial weeks of a disabling illness or accident. These policies will typically cover the first six to 12 months of a disability. They provide coverage during the waiting period, until the start of a long-term disability insurance policy. When the short-term policy expires your long-term disability insurance will pay a portion of your salary usually 50-60% of your pay, depending on the policy. These long-term benefits will remain in effect until you’re healthy enough to return to work, or for a specific number of years, as defined in the policy.

The Definition of “Social Security Disability”

The criteria for receiving Social Security disability benefits in North Carolina are identical to other states, as SSDI (Social Security Disability Insurance) and SSI (Supplemental Security Income) are federal programs administered by the Social Security Administration (SSA). In order to satisfy the approval criteria, the medical and vocational evidence of your case must satisfy the Social Security definition of “disability.” That definition states that you must have at least one severe medical condition—either physical or mental—which lasts for at least one year. Your disability must keep you from being able to work and earn what the SSA believes to be a “substantial and gainful” income. That doesn’t mean that you can’t work when you apply for disability—but if you’re working, your earnings must be less than the Social Security gross monthly earnings limit.

Permanent Disability

The SSA will assume that when an individual’s disability has lasted for at least one full year, it’s most likely a permanent disability. Nonetheless, the SSA regularly reviews these claims after they’ve been approved.

In North Carolina and across the country, there’s no need to wait until you’ve suffered with a condition for a full year before you file for disability. If you have a serious disability that appears like it will keep you out of work for a year, you can go ahead and file for Social Security disability – the agency’s disability examiner will review your medical records and determine if your condition will last more than a year.

How We Can Help

Litigation can arise when plaintiffs are unjustly deprived of their benefits. For example, individuals have filed lawsuits against the SSA contesting the results of medical reports, examinations, and testing in an effort to establish or regain their Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits. The Deuterman Law Group has experienced Social Security and disability attorneys who know the regulations and the process down to the last detail. They’ll make certain you receive all the Social Security benefits you deserve.

 

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